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Archive for December, 2008

Those of you who are regular readers of the PetPoint Journal will recall that in our first issue, published August 21 st 2007, we indicated that the intake of animals through shelters using PetPoint was generally evenly split between cats and dogs. While shelter staff generally acknowledge the existence of a “Kitten Season” and the impact that has on intake levels of cats, fewer seem to acknowledge the fact that there is a “Dog Season” as well.

The following graph represents the percentage of dog intakes versus cat intakes on a month by month basis from January 2006 to October 2008. For the purposes of this graph we have used intake data from animals that were surrendered or returned by their owners together with those that were stray; we have not included animals that were designated transferred in, seized, clinic, wildlife or service at intake.

The most noticeable facet of the graph is the regularity of the pattern.

The chart demonstrates a cyclical pattern with higher dog surrenders and returns during the colder months December, January, February, and March (“Dog Season”) and higher cat intakes during the warmer months May, June, July, August, September, and October (“Cat Season”). November and April are the “Cross Over months” where we see equal intakes of cats and dogs.

Animal welfare workers who are responsible for planning, purchasing and staff information sessions can use the cyclical nature of species intakes to plan ahead more effectively.

The winter Cross Over month – November – is the perfect time to remind staff and volunteers of your intake protocols for dogs, including medical and behavioral assessment, preventative care, warning symptoms for communicable diseases, vaccination, identification, quarantine, spay and neuter. Check out your supplies to make sure that you have sufficient supplies and prepared housing facilities for an increase in dog intakes.

Similarly the summer Cross Over month – May – is the perfect time to remind staff and volunteers of your intake protocols for cats, including medical and behavioral assessment, preventative care, warning symptoms for communicable diseases, vaccination, identification, quarantine, spay and neuter. Check out your supplies to make sure that you have sufficient supplies and prepared housing facilities for an increase in cat intakes.

With Dog Season now upon us, don’t forget to check that you have adequate supplies of our Dog-Eared product to make your life easier when cleaning the new dog intakes.

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